Course Information

 

for Arts&Sci Department


Intro Bio w/Lab (BIO 101)

Credits:4

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 101 - Introduction to Biology - is designed to provide students with an introduction to general biology with emphasis on the human model. Topics covered in the course will include cell structure and function, human evolution, anatomy and physiology, genetics, and the human impact on the environment. This course will acquaint students with the fundamental terms, concepts, and principles of human biology as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 1 Lab: 4 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None. This course is ideal for students in need of a refresher course prior to enrolling in BIO 111, 112, and 121. NOTE: Students may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Structure & Function of Body (BIO 102)

Credits:4

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 102 - Structore and Fuction of The Body - introduces the students to a basic understanding of anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course also describes the structural and functional relationships among the organ systems. CREDITS: 4 Lecture, 9 Lab; 4 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE CO-REQUISITES: NONE

Biological Concepts Tut (BIO 110)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 110 - A Basic Biological Concepts Tutorial - This one-credit course is intended to run parallel with BIO 111 and BIO 112 and will provide support instruction in underlying biological concepts critical to mastery of Anatomy and Physiology. Through models and other contemporary hands-on modes of instruction, the course will focus on basic biological concepts that are fundamental not only for success in A&P, but also for subsequent nursing instruction. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, 0 Lab: 1 Semester Credit PRE-REQUISITES: None C0-REQUISITES: Can be taken only concurrently with BIO 111.

Anatomy & Physiology I w/Lab (BIO 111)

Credits:4

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 111 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I - is the first phase of a two-semester course designed to provide students with an understanding of the structure and function of human organ systems. A brief review of biological chemistry will be followed by an introduction to cells and tissues. This information will form the basis for the following course content as it relates to the integumentary, osseous (bone), muscular, and nervous systems. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 1 Lab: 4 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None. A course in general biology strongly encouraged •Completion of this course is required for progression into the second semester of the nursing program.

Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (BIO 111L)

Credits:0

Anatomy & Physiology II w/Lab (BIO 112)

Credits:4

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 112 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II - continues to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. The study of the processes underlying human functioning is also incorporated. The course includes integrated study of the autonomic nervous system, the stress response, special senses, blood, and the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. The course also includes an overview of heredity, development and genetics. Laboratory exercises are designed to complement topics covered in class presentations. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 1 Lab: 4 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 111

Anatomy & Physiology II Lab (BIO 112L)

Credits:0

A&P - Breadth & Movement (BIO 113)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 113 - Anatomy and Physiology through Breadth and Movement - The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to review foundations of A&P while also learning basic breathing and relaxation techniques and gentle movement routines. The objective of the course is not only to refresh A&P knowledge for students who are currently taking nursing courses and scored less than 50 on the A&P Review Test, but also to provide an opportunity for any student with less than recent A&P instruction to update their knowledge base. Stress management strategies are embedded in the course syllabus to help the student nurse develop healthy habits that can also be shared with future patients. While the A&P review portion of the course will be taught by a faculty member, instruction on breadth/movement will be given by a certified yoga instructor. A&P content related to all organ systems will be presented in this review of basic concepts; however, the course will have a special focus on those organ systems that are most impacted by breathing and movement. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 112.

Microbiology w/Lab (BIO 121)

Credits:4

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 121 - Microbiology - is designed to introduce the student to basic knowledge regarding the morphology and physiology of microorganisms relevant to health care settings and the living environment as a whole. While emphasis is on direct microbe-human interaction, discussion will incorporate aspects from the growing awareness of global microbial transfer and the passage of microorganisms from animals to humans (zoonoses). Methods for infection control will include study of the body’s own immune response, the current spectrum of anti-microbial agents in use and public health strategies that incorporate both. Laboratory exercises will enhance and elucidate topics covered in lecture presentations. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 1 Lab: 4 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None Students must complete BIO 121 before beginning second-year nursing courses.

Microbiology Lab (BIO 121L)

Credits:0

Food and Fitness (BIO 160)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 160 - Food and Fitness - builds upon principles from Human Anatomy and Physiology. This one credit on-line course will prepare students to apply critical thinking and computer-based research skills in assessing their personal food and fitness status. Course modules will advance exploration of contemporary health and wellness issues, by introducing students to Internet and social media resources in order to construct and implement an evidence-based personal food and fitness improvement plan with lifelong benefits. In conclusion, based upon their findings, students will present an informed food and fitness policy recommendation. NOTE: This is intended for the students who need 1 credit hour to complete their BIO courses. Any student can enroll. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, 0 Lab: 1 Semester Credit PRE-REQUISITES: None.

Biology of Food (BIO 180)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 180 - Biology of Food - focuses on nutrition and related physiological concepts as an introductory course intended to provide an overview of core principles in nutrition, including the role of nutrition in health and metabolism of the human body. Essential roles of nutrients and other dietary food components will be discussed, with attention in conditions such as pregnancy and disease. Emphasis is placed on how specific nutritional states affect the function of body systems. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Biotechnology (BIO 201)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 201 - Biotechnology - Molecular biology has revolutionized the way the life sciences are studied. In this course, students will review the structure of DNA and the role of DNA in the formation of proteins, examine the ways gene expression is controlled in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and explore the ways in which DNA is manipulated and analyzed. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 101 or permission of instructor.

Intro to Immunology (BIO 211)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 211 - Introduction to Immunology - is a dynamic and expansive field of biology. The aim of this course is to introduce students to essential immunological concepts. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 101 or permission of instructor.

Intro to Molecular Biology (BIO 212)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 212 - Introduction to Molecular Biology - Molecular biology has has revolutionized the way the health sciences detect, diagnose, and treat disease. This course provides students with a brief history of molecular biology. The methods employed in the isolation and analysis of DNA will be presented along with a discussion of the ethical and legal ramifications of DNA test results. CREDITS: 3 Lecutre, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Core Concepts in Pharmacology (BIO 215)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 215 - Core Concepts in Pharmacology - is an introductory course intended to provide an overview of core principles in pharmacology, including pharmacodynamics as it relates to the fate of drugs when they interact within the human body. It will include a clinical survey of pharmaceuticals by category with a focus on prominently profiled drugs as they pertain to specific organ systems. The course does not assume a strong background in the natural sciences. In this course, prerequisite science knowledge is reviewed prior to presenting core concepts. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 112

Core Concepts in Pharmacology (BIO 215A)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 215 - Core Concepts in Pharmacology - is an introductory course intended to provide an overview of core principles in pharmacology, including pharmacodynamics as it relates to the fate of drugs when they interact within the human body. It will include a clinical survey of pharmaceuticals by category with a focus on prominently profiled drugs as they pertain to specific organ systems. The course does not assume a strong background in the natural sciences. In this course, prerequisite science knowledge is reviewed prior to presenting core concepts. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 112 *The A designation after the Course ID indicates this course is taught in an accelerated format to students already practicing in the RN field, or to student in the Accelerated BSN program and have previously earned a Bachelor's Degree.

Pathophysiology (BIO 300)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 300 - Pathophysiology - focuses on the mechanisms and concepts of selected pathological disturbances to the human body. Emphasis is placed on how the specific pathological condition effects the functioning of the system involved as well as its impact on all other body systems. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 112

Pathophysiology (BIO 300A)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 300 - Pathophysiology - focuses on the mechanisms and concepts of selected pathological disturbances to the human body. Emphasis is placed on how the specific pathological condition effects the functioning of the system involved as well as its impact on all other body systems. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: BIO 112 *The A designation after the Course ID indicates this course is taught in an accelerated format to students already practicing in the RN field, or to student in the Accelerated BSN program and have previously earned a Bachelor's Degree.

Epidemiology (BIO 310)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: BIO 310 - Epidemology - is an introductory course that has a focus on the distrbution and determinatnts of health-related issues in specific populations and the use of this study to control public health problems. This course explores cause of disease, transmission, screening, incidence and prevalence of disease and the ethics involved around developing public policies for disease control. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: MAT 105 CO-REQUISITES: STAT 201

BSN-Gen Elect Trans Crse (3 crs) (BSN-GE3E)

Credits:3

Chemistry-Gen/Org/Bio (CHEM 105)

Credits:4

COURSE DESCRIPTION: CHEM 105 Chemistry - (General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry) provides an overview of key concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry and how they relate to the body. Students will learn important concepts of general chemistry (including measurement; atomic structure; chemical reactions; and acids, bases, and solutions) and be introduced to concepts of organic and biological chemistry. This course will include time in the lab performing experiments for hands-on application of the material covered in the lecture. CREDITS: 4 Lecture, 1 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ACT score of at least 22 on the math section or TEAS score of at least 58.7% on the math portion OR successful completion of MAT 105. CO-REQUISITES: NONE

Speech & Oral Comm (COM 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: COM 101 - Speech and Oral Communication - is designed to equip the student to communicate effectively with individuals and before large and small groups. Focus is on communicating clearly and persuasively, without offense, in order to be effective in personal interactions both within the workplace and in one’s personal life, and to be competent in making presentations. Students will learn strategies to become comfortable speaking in public, and to prepare and make presentations effectively. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, and practice presentations with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits CO-REQUISITES: ENG 101

Essentials of Communication (COM 102)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: COM 102 - Essentials of Communication - is designed to introduce students to the essentials of both public speaking and interpersonal communication in theory and practice. In the area of public speaking, focus is on communicating clearly and persuasively in order to be competent in making presentations. Students will learn strategies to become comfortable speaking in front of an audience, and to prepare presentations effectively. In the area of interpersonal communication, focus is on the development of communication competence. Students will learn to understand, acquire, change, develop and/or improve interpersonal skills. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, practice presentations other in-class activities with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE CO-REQUISITES: NONE

Intro Interpers Comm (COM 110)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: COM 110 - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication - is designed to introduce students to theory and practice in interpersonal (one-on-one) communication. Focus is on the development of communication competence. Students will learn to understand, acquire, change, develop and/or improve interpersonal skills. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, and classroom activities with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits CO-REQUISITES: ENG 101

Practical Communication (COM 315)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: COM 315 -Practical Communication - provides an applied view of commuication, its scope and importance in practice, particularly in the business context. and the role of communication in establishing external and internal working relationships. As a practical communications class, students will learn how to design effective messages for diverse audiences and how to present that information in a credible and convincing way, both written and oral, from concepts to delivery. This course presents communication as integral to management strategy and as a critical component for success in the workplace. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ENG 101

DEGREE COMPLETION (ABSN) (DEG ABSN)

Credits:30

EARNED DEGREE (HCA) (DEGREE)

Credits:20

Eng Comp Preview (ENG 099)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: English 099 - English Composition Preview - prepares students for the demands and requirements of the introductory college composition course. The focus is on understanding and correctly applying the rules of English grammar with respect to sentence boundaries and other basic rules of effective writing. Students also learn to focus and develop paragraphs and to organize and develop coherent essays. Effective critical reading strategies are also developed and practiced. Intensive work in the Writing Center may be required as needed. This course is a pre-requisite for ENG 101. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Developmental Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None. Students enrolled in ENG 099 must successfully complete ENG 099 before: a) enrolling in ENG 101 (English Composition); or, b) before previously earned transfer credit can be posted to your academic record. •ENG 099 credit will count toward the residency requirement.

English Composition (ENG 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 101 - English Composition - fosters development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills that are important to academic and professional success and satisfaction. Through reading, discussing and writing about rich and complex texts (mainly nonfiction prose), students will learn how critical reading, open and unbiased discussion, and effective writing are closely interrelated skills, strengthening each and experiencing the value of each for the other. Students will become more perceptive readers and more articulate and aware thinkers and writers, able to apply these strengths in any academic or professional situation. Students will participate in conversations about texts, ideas and writing projects to foster critical thinking and effective expression. Students will learn and practice all the stages of an effective writing process and will become able to write high-quality papers that follow the conventions and meet the logical and stylistic expectations of formal academic and professional prose. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE CO-REQUISITES: NONE

American Lit I: to 1865 (ENG 201)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 201 - Survey of American Literature I: Beginnings to 1865 - will familiarize the student with major authors, texts, themes, techniques and movements of the literature of the United States from colonial beginnings through the Civil War. Works of literature and literary movements will be considered both as manifestations of broad cultural, philosophical and artistic streams running through Western civilization, and as expressions of distinctively American attitudes and perspectives. Students will receive an orientation to American literary history as well as intensive practice and guidance in comprehending and interpreting rich works of literature. As a survey of American literature, the course will emphasize ways the literature reflects and informs American experience, but will also provide an opportunity for the student to experience and reflect on essential functions of works of literature in general, as lenses on the existential situation and psychology of individual human beings and as insightful reflections of social realities. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ENG 101 NOTE: Students who have completed or transferred in ENG 101, may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

American Lit II: from 1865 (ENG 202)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 202 - Survey of American Literature II: 1865 to the Present - will familiarize the student with major authors, texts, themes, techniques and movements of the literature of the United States from the post-Civil War period to the present. Works of literature and literary movements will be considered both as manifestations of broad cultural, philosophical and artistic streams running through Western civilization, and as expressions of distinctively American attitudes and perspectives. Students will receive an orientation to American literary history as well as intensive practice and guidance in comprehending and interpreting rich works of literature. As a survey of American literature, the course will emphasize ways the literature reflects and informs American experience, but will also provide an opportunity for the student to experience and reflect on essential functions of works of literature in general, as lenses on the existential situation and psychology of individual human beings and as insightful reflections of social realities. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, O Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ENG 101. ENG 201 is not required to enroll in ENG 202. NOTE: Students who have completed or transferred in ENG 101, may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Comp for Practical Comm (ENG 205)

Credits:3

ENG 205 - Composition for Practical Communication - This course is designed to expand on knowledge gained in ENG 101. While continuing to investigate methods of effective writing, the course will focus on a business-specific context. Students will improve their abilities to research and analyze complex ideas, to appreciate and develop the skill of effective rhetoric, and to write clear, grammatical, well-structured communications. They will learn to regard effective business writing in terms of a series of strategic choices, including choosing from among a repertoire of tones and styles appropriate in different situations and with different audiences. Students will also improve their editing and critiquing skills, so that they can distinguish effective from ineffective writing and become better writers in a business context. PRE_REQUISITE: ENG 101

Intro to Poetry (ENG 210)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 210 - Introduction to Poetry - provides a survey of the formal elements of poetry and practice in reading poems. Students will tackle poems of all levels of difficulty and sophistication together, carefully and deliberately, through reading assignments, class discussion and activities, and guidance from the instructor. Students will gradually learn the techniques and features of poetry and become able to comprehend and analyze classic and contemporary poems with increasing confidence. The course enables students to understand the insight poetic expression provides into human life and to appreciate the experience of poetry at the elemental level of sound and musical effects. The reading load is light, with class activities focused on clarifying and deepening student understanding of assigned readings. The course is designed to satisfy general education and humanities requirements in-house or when transferred to other institutions. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, O Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ENG 101. NOTE: Students who have completed or transferred in ENG 101, may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Comp for Practical Comm (ENG 215)

Credits:3

COIURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 215 - Composition or Practical Communication - and writing appropriate to associate degree study in the health sciences. They will write multiple drafts of papers to improve the clarity and effectiveness of their writing, in accord with best composition practices. They will receive training and guidance in writing a review of healthcare literature, which is a basic skill in the scholarship of evidence-based practice (EBP). They will be coached in APA format, in revising and editing strategies, and in grammar and style so that they become able to produce proficient writing for health sciences courses and build a foundation for advanced academic and professional communication in the health sciences. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab, 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ENG 101 or equivalent.

Literature and Medicine (ENG 231)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 231 - Literature and Medicine - provides an opportunity for nursing and health sciences majors to gain insight into the human experience of illness, health and healthcare. In addition to symptoms and needs related to physical illness, all patients also have stories (as do healthcare practitioners as well), and the power of literature reveals dimensions of the experience of disease, healing and death that can help healthcare practitioners develop empathy and insight into patients and themselves, better enabling them to provide care that is effective and humanly satisfying for both care receiver and care giver. In this course we will read and discuss stories, poems, plays and essays by and about doctors, nurses and patients. There will be regular participation in class discussion and online discussion boards, and one paper. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, 0 Lab: 1 Semester Credit PRE-REQUISITES: NONE

Adv Comp: Evidence-Based Writing (ENG 315)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENG 315 - Advanced Composition: Evidence-Based Writing - provides students with training and practice in writing for bachelor-level study and professional practice. Students will practice improved composition strategies in revision and editing appropriate to proficient and polished communication. This course prepares students for current academic responsibilities and establishes a foundation for future academic and professional excellence in communication. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: ENG 101

Humanities Through The Arts (FA 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: FA 101 - Humanities Through the Arts - introduces students to the humanities through the lens of the 'arts'. To achieve this goal, students will study the visual arts in a historical framework ranging from the Paleolithic to the early 20th century. As students examine the arts, they also will explore how we can 'read' them. This means that they will both learn and master a specialized vocabulary to discuss the works as well as develop the ability to discern the values of the culture(s)/artist(s) that produced the arts. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, O Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None.

Learning Foundations (FYE 102)

Credits:2

COURSE DESCRIPTION: FYE 102 - Learning Foundations - will provide an arena where students can establish effective partnerships with faculty, administrators, staff, and other students. The course provides co-curricular programs that engage the student to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the college’s mission of lifelong learning and provides an exciting and challenging environment that promotes academic excellence and personal growth. CREDITS: 2 Lecture, 0 Lab: 2 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Skills for Computer Literacy (FYE 110)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: FYE 110 - Skills for Computer Literacy - will provide you with knowledge and skills to access and utilize basic computer technology. You will gain competencies in computer terminology, personal computer skills, effective web usage and office products, with emphasis on technology used at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, 0 Lab: 1 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE

Dietetic Technician Cert/Deg (GE-DIET)

Credits:20

Genl Elect Trans Crse (GE-ELECT G)

Credits:1

Genl Elect Trans Crse (GE-ELECT H)

Credits:1

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (GE-HIT)

Credits:20

SmartPrep Course (GEN 099)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: GEN 099 - SmartPrep Course - will provide students an opportunity to strengthen Reading, Math, Science, and/or English knowledge and skills identified on the TEAS test. A generated personalized study plan will include modules with associated learning activities. Refection activities will increase awareness of personal learning needs and foster growth. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, 0 Lab: 1 Semester Credit PRE-REQUISITES: NONE CO-REQUISITES: NONE

Academic & Life Transitions (GEN 101)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION GEN 101 - Academic and Life Transitions - is designed to facilitate the students’ successful transition to the college setting and achievement of his or her educational goals. The course provides the student the opportunity to learn and adopt skills for academic success. All students are required to take this course. Topics include learning style, study and testing skills, learning to learn, note-taking, as well as general success skills such as communication, critical thinking, self-awareness, and time and resource management. This course identifies the path to positive and successful learning experiences. The course emphasizes group interaction and collaborative learning. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, O Lab: 1 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None. •This course is identified as a Signature Course at The Christ College. As such, all students admitted to the college beginning 2008 through 2010 are required to take this course at the College as part of the Residency Requirement. •Completion of this course is required for progression into the second semester of the nursing program. Students must complete GEN 101 before enrolling in NUR 130 or NUR 150.

Social History of the Western World (HIS 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: HIS 101 - A Social History of the Western World - The purpose of this course is to explore with you the broad historical patterns of societies that comprise the vaguely-defined but often-cited “Western world.” To achieve this goal, we will study these patterns in a chronological framework ranging from the Paleolithic past to the postmodern present. In addition, we will critically examine historical documents both to understand the societies that produced them as well as their relevance for the present. This means that you will both learn and master a specialized vocabulary to discuss the documents and develop the ability to discern the intent of those societies that produced them. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None.

Coll Inquiry Found Sem (HUM 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: HUM 101 - Collaborative Inquiry Foundations Seminar - engages students in the reading and discussion of short, accessible, culturally important selections from classic and contemporary works in the humanities that raise enduringly fascinating questions, such as the individual’s identity and relation to the community, the means of individual and group empowerment, the sources of authority, differences and similarities among people, and the possibilities of shared collaborative enterprises—in other words, how human society works and how we can more powerfully contribute our share in cooperation with others. In a seminar format, with short texts at the center of discussion, students learn to more clearly formulate and express their ideas, and in the process, they learn to speak and listen responsibly and respectfully to others. Students investigate their individual assumptions and presuppositions and compare and contrast them with other ideas articulated in class or by the author, thereby learning to read more closely and comprehend more accurately. Gradually, students assume greater responsibility for their own learning, even sharing in leadership of discussions. Students grow individually and as a group through a series of engaging learning experiences that systematically foster respect, creative thinking and problem solving, and a genuine sense of connection through a shared focus on important concepts. NOTE: This course may be used by RN-BSN students to satisfy their total BSN degree requirement of 120 semester credits. It can satisfy either the Arts and Humanities Requirement or General Elective Requirement. ADN students may take this course to fulfill their General Elective Requirement or Residency Requirement. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE

College Reading (HUM 102)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: HUM 102 - College Reading - provides students with a foundation of strategies, skills and practices that enables them to actively engage with and master college reading material. Students learn how to preview, annotate, comprehend and analyze textbooks and other reading materials in order to work with the concepts they contain in ways that demonstrate college-level intellectual proficiency. The course builds student confidence and prepares them for active learning in all their college courses. It gives them practice and prepares them for success in objective test taking and writing papers based on assigned reading. It provides skills and builds aptitudes that enable students to master the concepts of coursework in general education and their major and to engage in lifelong learning to whatever extent they choose. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits. PRE-REQUISITES: NONE

People and Their Food (HUM 280)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: HUM 280 - People and Their Food - explores the dynamic intersect between historic human food traditions and the social structures that inform these traditions. Students will investigate shifting trends in contemporary agriculture food production and grapple, through critical analysis, with frequently conflicting perspectives on its environmental impact and the complex issues of food scarcity and social justice. Through research-driven discussion and debate, students will propose sustainable solutions while becoming more compassionate and engaged citizens. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Service Learning in Comm (IS 200)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: IS 200 - Service Learning in Our Community - is an interdisciplinary/inter-professional course in which the student is introduced to service learning. In this course, students will have the opportunity to interact with diverse populations while contributing to the community through hands-on service activities. Ongoing student reflection will focus on how the various service activities contributed toward the meeting of course outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning. CREDITS: 1 Lecture, 0 Lab: 1 Semester Credit PRE-REQUISITES: None

Roles of Women in Society (IS 201)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: IS 201 - The Roles of Women in Society - explores the lives of women in past and contemporary cultures, focusing especially on the themes of domestic roles, workplace roles, image roles, violence roles, and even how women are and have been defined. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None.

Using Arts in Healing (IS 231)

Credits:2

COURSE DESCRIPTION: IS 231 - Using the Arts in Healing - expores why and how to utilize the Arts in Healthcare. After examining the relationship betwen the Arts, the body, the mind, and wellness, students will explore the Arts in hands-on classes led by painters, writers, poets, dancers, sculptors, and musicians. Ultimately, students will use their arts experiences and developed understanding of wellness to propose an evidence-based approach to using the Arts in healthcare. CREDITS: 2 Lecture, O Lab: 2 semester credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE

Wellness Hlth Promo (IS 300)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: IS 300 - Wellness and Health Promotion - In this course, we will discuss wellness and health promotion for all people, and we must begin with an appreciative curiosity about the differences in people. Establishing an understanding about how individual’s perceptions of wellness are influenced by values and beliefs, will enable you to assist individuals, families, and communities to recognize the significance of health and wellness. We will also discuss alternative theories of health and wellness. We will explore holistic care, nutrition, activity and exercise, stress and coping, and preventative medicine as strategies to promote health and wellness. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: SOPS 101 or equivalent. SOPS 105 and SOPS 210 or equivalent are recommended. The prerequisite is waived for students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program.

College Algebra (MAT 105)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: MAT 105 - College Algebra - is designed to study the basic concepts of arithmetic and algebra, the real numbers, linear equations, inequalities, quadratic equations, graphing, rational expressions, functions, exponents, radicals, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and systems of linear equations. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 Lab, 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: NONE

Intro to Ethics (PHI 103)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: PHI 103 - Introduction to Ethics - will assist students in coming to understand the various theoretical, conceptual frameworks, and application models of moral reasoning. Such applications of theoretical models and frameworks will expose the student to different approaches to moral competence and decision-making in complex life situations. This course aims to be holistic in its approach; hence ethics-related issues involving medical/health issues will be minimized and a broad humanities-based approach will be incorporated. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, O Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None.

Theory of Knowledge (PHI 201)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the study of skepticism and certainty, knowledge and belief, perception, memory and truth. Prerequisites: PHI 101 & PHI 103 or permission of the instructor.

World Religions (PHI 205)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: PHI 205 - World Religions - is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of and appreciation for the major religions of the world; Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam. In addition the course will explore indigenous spiritual paths such as Celtic and Native American spiritual traditions. The course will explore the history of each tradition, its core beliefs, cosmology, canon of sacred writings, and styles of prayer and worship. This course will also explore humanism in its various forms, as well as atheism. The course will also address the influence of these various traditions on society, as well as the issues surrounding the diversity of religious traditions in a highly pluralistic society. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None. NOTE: Students may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Ethical Issues Hlth Care (PHI 210)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Health Care and Research - Based on their prior knowledge of ethical reasoning and traditional and contemporary moral theories, learners will explore through reading, research, and experiential learning activities the ethical issues embedded within contemporary healthcare and health research. Using their moral reasoning skills, leaners will have the opportunity to propose ethical solutions to the many problems that arise within today’s healthcare and bioresearch. CREDITS •3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: PHI 103

Lifespan Development (PSY 110)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: PSY 110 - Lifespan Development - explores the psychological theories/conceptual frameworks and research that inform the study of cognitive, personality, and social development across the lifespan. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits CO-REQUISITES: SOPS 101 or equivalent. NOTE: Students may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Concepts of Behavior Change (PSY 210)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: PSY 210 - Concepts of Behavior Change - builds on the foundational knowledge in introductory social sciences courses that focus on understanding thought and behavior to help learners understand how and why people change their behavior. Theories of learning, goal-setting, performance, sports psychology, motivation, and self-reflection will be used to help learners see why people do or do not change their behavior so that, ultimately, methods can be used to design plans for those that could benefit from changes in behavior. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab : 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Intro to Sociology (SOC 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: What makes up a society? A society is composed of separate, but interrelated components, or social institutions. The family, government, education, and religion are some of the large structures that guide our everyday lives. Introduction to Sociology explores these institutions of society, along with other individual factors, such as race, class, and gender, in order to understand what it means to live in a global society. Students are given the opportunity to develop their sociological imagination to become critical of the world around them, and will learn to analyze this social world using a variety of theoretical perspectives. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None.

Soc Perspect on US Diversity (SOC 102)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: SOC 102 - Sociological Perspectives on U.S. Diversity - is designed so that students will gain insights into, and learn the various sociological analyses of, the strengths, challenges and opportunities facing the United States and its incredibly diverse population. Particular emphasis will be placed on multicultural awareness, race, ethnicity, social class, and gender. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: SOC 101 or equivalent or SOPS 101 NOTE: Students may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Soc Perspect on Global Diversity (SOC 103)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: SOC 103 - Sociological Perspectives on Global Diversity - is designed so that students will gain insights into, and learn the various sociological analyses of, the strengths, challenges and opportunities facing the global diverse populations. Particular emphasis will be placed on multicultural awareness, race, ethnicity, social class, and gender. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: SOC 101 or equivalent or SOPS 101. •NOTE: Students may desire to take this course in fulfillment of the residency requirement or for the pursuit of lifelong learning as discussed in the general education purpose. IMPORTANT: Students desiring to transfer this course to another institution of higher learning are encouraged to check with their respective college or university to verify transfer eligibility.

Seminar on Race (SOC 200)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: SOC 200 - Seminor on Race - Explore the ways that race still matters in a society that considers itself to be post-racial. In this discussion-based seminar, we consider what race is, how it is socially constructed, and the ways that institutional discrimination and inequality persist. How we interpret our own racial identity is guided by the ways we understand race operating in our society. Throughout the course, we reflect on our everyday experiences to better understand how race is relevant – including in a healthcare environment. CREDITS: 1 Credit Hour PRE-REQUISITE: NONE An introductory course in Sociology and/or Psychology, like SOPS 101, SOC 101, or PSY 101 is strongly recommended.

Intro to Social Psychology (SOPS 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: SOPS 101 - Introduction to Social Psychology - Social psychology is the systematic study of human social behavior. In this course, you will study how individuals and groups of people behave, and what causes these behaviors. You will learn to use theoretical perspectives to answer questions like, “Why are people attracted to one another?” and “When are we most likely to help a stranger?” and “Why do some people follow rules, while other people break them?” You will study classical and contemporary research to understand how the scientific method is used to test and create theories of social behavior. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Soc/Cul Issues in Healthcare (SOPS 105)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: SOPS 105 - Social and Cultural Issues in Regional Healthcare - Health Care in our region is delivered in a variety of settings by diverse human beings using many different methods: in clinics, hospitals, schools, even grocery stores! This course invites you to explore these settings and to better understand our health care system. At the center of this exploration will be us, the human beings seeking and giving the care. We will discuss the social and cultural factors (determinants) that influence individuals’ health decisions and behaviors as well as the social and cultural competencies expected of health care providers. We will also explore our health care system, discussing organization and structure, and the places and ways health care is delivered and experienced. CREDITS: 3 Lecture, 0 Lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None

Current Topics in Health (SOPS 201)

Credits:1

COURSE DESCRIPTION: SOPS 201 - Exploring Current Topics in Health - This course is intended to prepare advanced-standing students for lifelong learning and professional development. It also provides an opportunity for students to earn 1 credit hours working directly with faculty. Students will work directly with identified faculty member to explore a topic or concept from a multi-faceted perspective (for example, to explore cultural competency in a community-based health care organization or to conduct an asset mapping of social-service resources for an identified population). So the student will make connections with the college outcomes in a framework relevant to the learning needs of the student, students will engage in designing their own learning experience, assignment or projects, as well as methods for self-assessment and evaluation. CREDITS: 1 lecture, 0 lab: 1 Semester Credit PRE-REQUISITES: Permission of the Associate Dean and assignment to faculty member. Advanced-standing students only.

Intro to Statistics (STAT 201)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: STAT 201 - Introduction to Statistics - focuses on the use of statistics to conduct and critique research. Topics include: descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and the use of computer software for statistical applications. Students will learn to apply, analyze, and interpret statistics from research articles and data in the health care setting. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: MAT 105 or equivalent. The prerequisite is waived for students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program.

Intro to Statistics (STAT 201A)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: STAT 201 - Introduction to Statistics - focuses on the use of statistics to conduct and critique research. Topics include: descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and the use of computer software for statistical applications. Students will learn to apply, analyze, and interpret statistics from research articles and data in the health care setting. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: MAT 105 or equivalent. The prerequisite is waived for students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program. *The A designation after the Course ID indicates this course is taught in an accelerated format to students already practicing in the RN field.

Technology Skills & Apps (TECH 101)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: TECH 101 - Basic Technology Skills and Applications: Being a contributing citizen in the 21st Century requires the use of technology. This course will provide a survey of trending ideas in the industry, cloud based applications, and an introduction to computer/technology skills for word processing, presentations and email correspondence.  CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITED: None

Excel Skills and Apps (TECH 201)

Credits:3

COURSE DESCRIPTION: TECH 201 - Escel Skills and Applications - This course will teach beginning to intermediate applications and features of Microsoft Escel, a spreadsheet program that is part of the Microsoft Office Suite. CREDITS: 3 lecture, 0 lab: 3 Semester Credits PRE-REQUISITES: None